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Assessing the contribution of breeds to genetic diversity in conservation schemes

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Author(s): Eding Herwin | Crooijmans Richard | Groenen Martien | Meuwissen Theo

Journal: Genetics Selection Evolution
ISSN 0999-193X

Volume: 34;
Issue: 5;
Start page: 613;
Date: 2002;
Original page

Keywords: conservation | genetic diversity | gene banks | marker estimated kinships | poultry

ABSTRACT
Abstract The quantitative assessment of genetic diversity within and between populations is important for decision making in genetic conservation plans. In this paper we define the genetic diversity of a set of populations, S, as the maximum genetic variance that can be obtained in a random mating population that is bred from the set of populations S. First we calculated the relative contribution of populations to a core set of populations in which the overlap of genetic diversity was minimised. This implies that the mean kinship in the core set should be minimal. The above definition of diversity differs from Weitzman diversity in that it attempts to conserve the founder population (and thus minimises the loss of alleles), whereas Weitzman diversity favours the conservation of many inbred lines. The former is preferred in species where inbred lines suffer from inbreeding depression. The application of the method is illustrated by an example involving 45 Dutch poultry breeds. The calculations used were easy to implement and not computer intensive. The method gave a ranking of breeds according to their contributions to genetic diversity. Losses in genetic diversity ranged from 2.1% to 4.5% for different subsets relative to the entire set of breeds, while the loss of founder genome equivalents ranged from 22.9% to 39.3%.
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