Academic Journals Database
Disseminating quality controlled scientific knowledge

Determinants of contraceptive use by women of reproductive age in Ukraine, results of 1999 survey

ADD TO MY LIST
 
Author(s): Matsera, Olena | Barska, Julia

Journal: Tobacco Control and Public Health in Eastern Europe
ISSN 2222-2693

Volume: 1;
Issue: 2;
Start page: 102;
Date: 2011;
VIEW PDF   PDF DOWNLOAD PDF   Download PDF Original page

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND. Purpose of contraception is to prevent abortion and thus its negative consequences. According to the WHO estimates, every day over 910 thousand babies are conceived in the world, with approximately 50% of pregnancies being not planned, and 25% unwanted. Our goal was to explore determinants of contraceptive use by women of reproductive age in Ukraine.METHODS. We used the data from the 1999 Ukraine Reproductive and Health Survey, which is nationally representative survey of 7129 women aged 15-44. The sample for analysis included 4192 women that were sexually active during 30 days before the interviewing, not pregnant, not trying to become pregnant, and fertile. As an outcome measure we considered contraceptive use/non use by the woman or her partner. Independent variables included age, education, region, type of place of residence, religion, age at first intercourse, marital status, working status, smoking, alcohol consumption, and intention to have any (more) children. Analysis included bivariate (using crosstabulation and Pearson’s chi-square test) and multivariate analysis with the use of binary logistic regression.RESULTS. Women aged 15-19 years had the lowest rate of contraceptive use. Women aged 20-39 years and older were more likely to use contraceptives compared to women 15-19 years of age. Women with complete secondary and higher education were more likely to use contraceptives. Dwellers of villages and small towns were less likely to use contraceptives than those living in large towns and cities. Women who belonged to religious minorities (Muslims, Jews) were less likely to use contraceptives compared to Christian Orthodox and non-religious women. Smokers were less likely to use contraceptives than non-smokers.CONCLUSIONS. Older, better educated women and those living in larger towns and cities were more likely to use contraceptives. Those who practiced less healthy behaviors were less likely to use contraceptives as well.
Save time & money - Smart Internet Solutions     

Tango Rapperswil
Tango Rapperswil