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Gene Expression Patterns in Myelodyplasia Underline the Role of Apoptosis and Differentiation in Disease Initiation and Progression

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Author(s): Merav Bar | Derek Stirewalt | Era Pogosova-Agadjanyan | Vitas Wagner | Ted Gooley | Nissa Abbasi | Ravi Bhatia | H. Joachim Deeg | Jerald Radich

Journal: Translational Oncogenomics
ISSN 1177-2727

Volume: 3;
Start page: 137;
Date: 2008;
Original page

Keywords: Myelodysplasia | Gene expression | Apoptosis | Differentiation

ABSTRACT
The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal stem cell disorders, characterized by ineffective and dysplastic hematopoiesis. The genetic and epigenetic pathways that determine disease stage and progression are largely unknown. In the current study we used gene expression microarray methodology to examine the gene expression differences between normal hematopoietic cells and hematopoietic cells from patients with MDS at different disease stages, using both unselected and CD34+ selected cells. Significant differences between normal and MDS hematopoietic cells were observed for several genes and pathways. Several genes promoting or opposing apoptosis were dysregulated in MDS cases, most notably MCL1 and EPOR. Progression from RA to RAEB(T) was associated with increased expression of several histone genes. In addition, the RAR-RXR pathway, critical for maintaining a balance between self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells, was found to be deregulated in hematopoietic cells from patients with advanced MDS compared to patients with refractory anemia. These findings provide new insights into the understanding of the pathophysiology and progression of MDS, and may guide to new targets for therapy. Taken together with previous published data, the present results also underscore the considerable complexity of the regulation of gene expression in MDS.
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