Academic Journals Database
Disseminating quality controlled scientific knowledge

High throughput sequencing in mice: a platform comparison identifies a preponderance of cryptic SNPs

ADD TO MY LIST
 
Author(s): Walter Nicole | Bottomly Daniel | Laderas Ted | Mooney Michael | Darakjian Priscila | Searles Robert | Harrington Christina | McWeeney Shannon | Hitzemann Robert | Buck Kari

Journal: BMC Genomics
ISSN 1471-2164

Volume: 10;
Issue: 1;
Start page: 379;
Date: 2009;
Original page

ABSTRACT
Abstract Background Allelic variation is the cornerstone of genetically determined differences in gene expression, gene product structure, physiology, and behavior. However, allelic variation, particularly cryptic (unknown or not annotated) variation, is problematic for follow up analyses. Polymorphisms result in a high incidence of false positive and false negative results in hybridization based analyses and hinder the identification of the true variation underlying genetically determined differences in physiology and behavior. Given the proliferation of mouse genetic models (e.g., knockout models, selectively bred lines, heterogeneous stocks derived from standard inbred strains and wild mice) and the wealth of gene expression microarray and phenotypic studies using genetic models, the impact of naturally-occurring polymorphisms on these data is critical. With the advent of next-generation, high-throughput sequencing, we are now in a position to determine to what extent polymorphisms are currently cryptic in such models and their impact on downstream analyses. Results We sequenced the two most commonly used inbred mouse strains, DBA/2J and C57BL/6J, across a region of chromosome 1 (171.6 – 174.6 megabases) using two next generation high-throughput sequencing platforms: Applied Biosystems (SOLiD) and Illumina (Genome Analyzer). Using the same templates on both platforms, we compared realignments and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection with an 80 fold average read depth across platforms and samples. While public datasets currently annotate 4,527 SNPs between the two strains in this interval, thorough high-throughput sequencing identified a total of 11,824 SNPs in the interval, including 7,663 new SNPs. Furthermore, we confirmed 40 missense SNPs and discovered 36 new missense SNPs. Conclusion Comparisons utilizing even two of the best characterized mouse genetic models, DBA/2J and C57BL/6J, indicate that more than half of naturally-occurring SNPs remain cryptic. The magnitude of this problem is compounded when using more divergent or poorly annotated genetic models. This warrants full genomic sequencing of the mouse strains used as genetic models.

Tango Rapperswil
Tango Rapperswil

     Affiliate Program