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Lipid emulsions – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 6

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Author(s): Adolph, M. | Heller, A. R. | Koch, T. | Koletzko, B. | Kreymann, K. G. | Krohn, K. | Pscheidl, E. | Senkal, M. | Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

Journal: GMS German Medical Science
ISSN 1612-3174

Volume: 7;
Start page: Doc22;
Date: 2009;
Original page

Keywords: lipid emulsions | alpha-tocopherol | hepatic steatosis | polyunsaturated fatty acids | critically ill

ABSTRACT
The infusion of lipid emulsions allows a high energy supply, facilitates the prevention of high glucose infusion rates and is indispensable for the supply with essential fatty acids. The administration of lipid emulsions is recommended within ≤7 days after starting PN (parenteral nutrition) to avoid deficiency of essential fatty acids. Low-fat PN with a high glucose intake increases the risk of hyperglycaemia. In parenterally fed patients with a tendency to hyperglycaemia, an increase in the lipid-glucose ratio should be considered. In critically ill patients the glucose infusion should not exceed 50% of energy intake. The use of lipid emulsions with a low phospholipid/triglyceride ratio is recommended and should be provided with the usual PN to prevent depletion of essential fatty acids, lower the risk of hyperglycaemia, and prevent hepatic steatosis. Biologically active vitamin E (α-tocopherol) should continuously be administered along with lipid emulsions to reduce lipid peroxidation. Parenteral lipids should provide about 25–40% of the parenteral non-protein energy supply. In certain situations (i.e. critically ill, respiratory insufficiency) a lipid intake of up to 50 or 60% of non-protein energy may be reasonable. The recommended daily dose for parenteral lipids in adults is 0.7–1.3 g triglycerides/kg body weight. Serum triglyceride concentrations should be monitored regularly with dosage reduction at levels >400 mg/dl (>4.6 mmol/l) and interruption of lipid infusion at levels >1000 mg/dl (>11.4 mmol/l). There is little evidence at this time that the choice of different available lipid emulsions affects clinical endpoints.
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