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Morphological and Electromyogram Analysis for the Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer to the Suprascapular Nerve in Rats

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Author(s): Jun Yan | Kazuhito Ogino | Jiro Hitomi

Journal: Surgical Science
ISSN 2157-9407

Volume: 02;
Issue: 05;
Start page: 269;
Date: 2011;
Original page

Keywords: Nerve Transfer Treatment | Fluorescent Dye Labeling | Electromyogram | Nerve Axonal Regeneration | Rat

ABSTRACT
For many years, nerve transfer has been commonly used as a treatment option following peripheral nerve injury, although the precise mechanism underlying successful nerve transfer is not yet clear. We developed an animal model to investigate the mechanism underlying nerve transfer between branches of the spinal accessory nerve (Ac) and suprascapular nerve (Ss) in rats, so that we could observe changes in the number of motor neurons, investigate the 3-dimensional localization of neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord, and perform an electromyogram (EMG) of the supraspinatus muscle before and after nerve transfer treatment. The present experiment showed a clear reduction in the number of γ motor neurons. The distributional portion of motor neurons following nerve transfer was mainly within the neuron column innervating the trapezius. Some neurons innervating the supraspinatus muscle also survived post-transfer. Compared with the non-operated group, the EMG restoration rate of the supraspinatus muscle following nerve transfer was 60% in the experimental group and 80% in a surgical control group. Following nerve transfer, there was a distinct reduction in the number of γ motor neurons. Therefore, γ motor neurons may have important effects on the recovery of muscular strength following nerve transfer. Moreover, because the neurons located in regions innervating either the trapezius or supraspinatus muscle were labeled after Ac transfer to Ss, we also suggest that indistinct axon regeneration mechanisms exist in the spinal cord following peripheral nerve transfer.
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