Academic Journals Database
Disseminating quality controlled scientific knowledge

THE POTENTIAL NEURAL MECHANISMS OF ACUTE INDIRECT VIBRATION

ADD TO MY LIST
 
Author(s): Darryl J. Cochrane

Journal: Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN 1303-2968

Volume: 10;
Issue: 1;
Start page: 19;
Date: 2011;
Original page

Keywords: Spinal reflexes | muscle tuning | motor unit firing frequency | motor unit synchronisation | inter-muscular co-ordination.

ABSTRACT
There is strong evidence to suggest that acute indirect vibration acts on muscle to enhance force, power, flexibility, balance and proprioception suggesting neural enhancement. Nevertheless, the neural mechanism(s) of vibration and its potentiating effect have received little attention. One proposal suggests that spinal reflexes enhance muscle contraction through a reflex activity known as tonic vibration stretch reflex (TVR), which increases muscle activation. However, TVR is based on direct, brief, and high frequency vibration (>100 Hz) which differs to indirect vibration, which is applied to the whole body or body parts at lower vibration frequency (5-45 Hz). Likewise, muscle tuning and neuromuscular aspects are other candidate mechanisms used to explain the vibration phenomenon. But there is much debate in terms of identifying which neural mechanism(s) are responsible for acute vibration; due to a number of studies using various vibration testing protocols. These protocols include: different methods of application, vibration variables, training duration, exercise types and a range of population groups. Therefore, the neural mechanism of acute vibration remain equivocal, but spinal reflexes, muscle tuning and neuromuscular aspects are all viable factors that may contribute in different ways to increasing muscular performance. Additional research is encouraged to determine which neural mechanism(s) and their contributions are responsible for acute vibration. Testing variables and vibration applications need to be standardised before reaching a consensus on which neural mechanism(s) occur during and post-vibration

Tango Rapperswil
Tango Rapperswil

     Affiliate Program