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Screening Antimicrobial Activity of Venoms from Snakes Commonly Found in Malaysia

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Author(s): T.M. San | J. Vejayan | K. Shanmugan | H. Ibrahim

Journal: Journal of Applied Sciences
ISSN 1812-5654

Volume: 10;
Issue: 19;
Start page: 2328;
Date: 2010;
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Keywords: Staphylococcus aureus | bacteria | therapeutic use | Venom | viper

ABSTRACT
The study was carried out to screen antimicrobial activity in venoms obtained from 11 species of snakes that are all common in Malaysia. Snake venom, which constitutes a diverse range of proteins, has long been identified as a potential source of therapeutics. Therefore, in times when antimicrobial resistance is becoming an increasingly severe issue, it is unsurprising that snake venoms are being investigated for antimicrobial components. Antibacterial activity was assessed using the hole-plate method. Venoms of Calloselasma rhodostoma and Ophiophagus hannah were capable of producing the most prominent bacterial inhibition zones with maximum values as high as 12 mm, while the other venoms screened only produced bacterial inhibition zones that were not more than 10 mm. These two venoms were selected for further determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The MIC values were tested with Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923, ATCC29213 and ATCC43300. The MIC values obtained for Calloselasma rhodostoma were 125 μg mL-1 when tested against S. aureus ATCC25923 and ATCC43300, while it was 250 μg mL-1 when tested against S. aureus ATCC29213. MIC values obtained for Ophiophagus hannah were 250 μg mL-1 when tested against all three strains. Since the potential of snake venoms for antimicrobial activity has been established, further study is in the progress to purify the active antimicrobial component and to screen a wider range of bacterial strains.

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