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Soil-Air exchange controls on background atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides

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Author(s): A. Cabrerizo | J. Dachs | K. C. Jones | D. Barceló

Journal: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
ISSN 1680-7316

Volume: 11;
Issue: 24;
Start page: 12799;
Date: 2011;
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ABSTRACT
Soils are the major terrestrial reservoir of persistent organic pollutants, and thus net volatilization from soil, when it happens, may exert a control on the atmospheric occurrence and variability of organic pollutants. Here, we report and discuss the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) such as hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexaclorocyclohexanes (HCH) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in the atmosphere and in soils, their measured fugacities in soil, the soil-air partition coefficients (KSA) and soil-air fugacity ratios (fs/fa) in rural background areas of N-NE Spain and N-NW England. Four sampling campaigns were carried out in Spain and UK to assess seasonal variability and differences between sampling sites. KSA values were significantly dependent on soil temperature and soil organic matter quantity, and to a minor extent on organic matter type. HCH isomers and DDT metabolites in soil are close to equilibrium with the overlying atmosphere at rural background areas of Spain with a tendency to volatilize and deposit during warm and cold periods, respectively. The mixture of HCH and DDT found in the atmosphere is clearly strongly influenced by the mixture of HCH and DDT which escapes from soil, with significant correlations between them (r2 ranging between 0.63–0.76 and p-level
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