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Williams–Campbell syndrome: a case report

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Author(s): Konoglou M | Porpodis K | Zarogoulidis P | Loridas N | Katsikogiannis N | Mitrakas A | Zervas V | Kontakiotis T | Papakosta D | Boglou P | Bakali S | Courcoutsakis N | Zarogoulidis K

Journal: International Journal of General Medicine
ISSN 1178-7074

Volume: 2012;
Issue: default;
Start page: 41;
Date: 2012;
Original page

ABSTRACT
Maria Konoglou1, Konstantinos Porpodis2, Paul Zarogoulidis2, Nikolaos Loridas1, Nikolaos Katsikogiannis3, Alexandros Mitrakas2, Vasilis Zervas2, Theodoros Kontakiotis2, Despoina Papakosta2, Panagiotis Boglou4, Stamatia Bakali5, Nikolaos Courcoutsakis6, Konstantinos Zarogoulidis21First Pulmonary Clinic, "G. Papanikolaou" General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Pulmonary Department, "G. Papanikolaou" General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Surgery Department (NHS), University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Greece; 4Pulmonary Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece; 5Microbiology Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece; 6Radiology Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, GreeceIntroduction: Williams–Campbell syndrome, also known as bronchomalacia, is a rare disorder characterized by a deficiency of cartilage in subsegmental bronchi, leading to distal airway collapse and bronchiectasis. There have been few reports about patients affected by saccular bronchiectasis, paracicatricial emphysema, and diminished cartilage. These are all characteristic of Williams–Campbell syndrome.Case presentation: This report presents a 57-year-old woman with progressive dyspnea, cough, sputum production, and fever. The clinical and laboratory examination revealed that the patient had a respiratory infection due to bronchiectasis caused by Williams–Campbell syndrome, which was undiagnosed in the patient until then.Conclusion: Although a rare syndrome, when patients' signs and symptoms include recurrent respiratory infections, bronchiectasis, productive cough, and dyspnea, Williams–Campbell syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis.Keywords: bronchietasis, Williams–Campbell syndrome, bronchomalacia
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