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DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN AMMONIA REMOVAL UNIT FROM THE EXHAUST GAS OF A MANURE DRYING SYSTEM

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Author(s): A. E. Ghaly | K. N. MacDonald

Journal: American Journal of Environmental Sciences
ISSN 1553-345X

Volume: 9;
Issue: 1;
Start page: 51;
Date: 2013;
Original page

Keywords: Ammonia | Manure | Scrubber | Thin layer drying | Bacteria | Odor | pH

ABSTRACT
The storage and handling of animal wastes is one of the main sources of ammonia gas emissions. Ammonia gas has a distinct, unpleasant odor and can become detrimental to the health of humans and animals at high concentrations. Ammonia emissions are of particular concern in manure drying systems, where large losses of nitrogen, in the form of ammonia can cause air quality concerns. The aim of this study was to develop an ammonia removal system for a poultry manure drying system. The thin layer drying of poultry manure in 1-3 cm thick layers resulted in effective sterilization; with the removal of 99.44-99.56% of total bacterial count, 88.51-93.705 of yeast and mold cells, 99.13-99.565 of E.coli cells, and complete removal of Salmonellae. The drying of poultry manure resulted in a large loss of nitrogen, through ammonia loss in the exhaust gasses. The use of a water scrubber resulted in a 75-99% removal of ammonia gas from the exhaust gases. The absorption of ammonia into the scrubber’s water resulted in an increase in pH, which subsequently fell as the drying process finished, and ammonia emission decreased. The heated air drying of poultry manure, with the use of an ammonia removal system proved effective in reducing the odor intensity and offensiveness of the poultry manure drying process, resulting in increased air quality. While producing a high value product.
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