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Study of the Nutritional Value and Hygienic Quality of Local Infant Flours from Chad, with the Aim of Their Use for Improved Infant Flours Preparation

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Author(s): Barnabas Kayalto | Cheikna Zongo | Raketa W. Compaore | Aly Savadogo | Brahim B. Otchom | Alfred S. Traore

Journal: Food and Nutrition Sciences
ISSN 2157-944X

Volume: 04;
Issue: 09;
Start page: 59;
Date: 2013;
Original page

Keywords: Childhood Flours | Nutritional Value | Hygienic Quality | Fortification | Chad

ABSTRACT
This study aims to develop infant flours fortified with iron and vitamin A, taken from local products such as powder from dried Moringa oleifera leaves and pulps of Parkia biglobosa to improve the nutritional status of children aged 6 to 24 months. Chemical analyses show that, for 100 g of local flours destined for children, there are adequate protein levels (between 7.00 ± 0.44 and 12.69 ± 0.44 g) and fat content (between 7.52 ± 0.35 and 16.26 ± 0.84 g), but that there are low levels of b-carotene and certain micronutrients Zn (0.67 ± 0.01 to 2.51 ± 0.19 mg), Fe (7.11 ± 0.90 to 12.70 ± 0.56 mg), Ca (0.67 ± 0.01 to 2.51 ± 0.19 mg), Mg (6.79 ± 0.19 to 24.99 ± 1.75 mg). Analyses of minerals and vitamins showed that Moringa oleifera leaf-powder (per 100 g) is rich in calcium (1443.90 ± 11.03 mg), magnesium (176.72 ± 0.73 mg), iron (53.75 ± 5.07 mg), zinc (17.58 ± 0.89 mg) and b-carotene (624.40 ± 0.41 μg ER). 100 g of Parkia biglobosa’s pulps is rich in magnesium (73.00 ± 1.14 mg), iron (14.82 ± 2.49 mg), zinc (7.79 ± 0.44 mg) and vitamin C (75.29 ± 0.00 mg). In conclusion, we believe that these two ingredients can be effectively used to fortify local infant flours in vitamin A and iron and contribute to eradicating malnutrition due to micronutrients deficiencies.
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