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Targeting the UPS as therapy in multiple myeloma

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Author(s): Chauhan Dharminder | Bianchi Giada | Anderson Kenneth

Journal: BMC Biochemistry
ISSN 1471-2091

Volume: 9;
Issue: Suppl 1;
Start page: S1;
Date: 2008;
Original page

ABSTRACT
Abstract The coordinated regulation of cellular protein synthesis and degradation is essential for normal cellular functioning. The ubiquitin proteasome system mediates the intracellular protein degradation that is required for normal cellular homeostasis. The 26S proteasome is a multi-enzyme protease that degrades redundant proteins; conversely, inhibition of proteasomal degradation results in intracellular aggregation of unwanted proteins and cell death. This observation led to the development of proteasome inhibitors as therapeutics for use in cancer. The clinical applicability of targeting proteasomes is exemplified by the recent FDA approval of the first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Although bortezomib represents a major advance in the treatment of this disease, it can be associated with toxicity and the development of drug resistance. Importantly, extensive preclinical studies suggest that combination therapies can both circumvent drug resistance and reduce toxicity. In addition, promising novel proteasome inhibitors, which are distinct from bortezomib, and exhibit equipotent anti-multiple myeloma activities, are undergoing clinical evaluation in order to improve patient outcome in multiple myeloma. Publication history Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com).
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